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Disdain, Distrust, and Dissolution: The Surge of Support for Independence in Catalonia

Monday, September 17, 2018 at 5:00pm

Sibley Hall, 115 W Sibley
942 University Ave, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA

GERMÀ BEL is Professor of Economics and Public Policy at University of Barcelona, Director of the Observatory of Analysis and Evaluation of Public Policies. He has been Visiting Professor at Cornell and Princeton, and Visiting Researcher at Harvard, Cornell, EUI-FSR., Paris I-Sorbonne, and KU Leuven. His research focuses on the economics and politics of Public sector reform, Infrastructure and transport, Local public services and Environmental policies. Between 1990 and 1993 he was an advisor to the Spanish Minister of Territorial Affairs and Public Administration, and the Minister of Public Works and Transportation. In 2000-04 he was member of the Spanish
Congress (Socialist Party, spokesperson for economic issues). In 2015-2017 he was member of the Catalan Parliament (Junts pel Si, Chair of the Committee on Environmental Issues).

ABSTRACT:
Support for independence in Catalonia has increased rapidly over the past decade. This dynamic is the result of Catalans in political, economic, social, academic, and cultural fields who no longer believe that the necessary reform of the Spanish Institutions is a viable option in terms of achieving an acceptable arrangement for Catalonia to stay within the Spanish State. Rejecting assimilation on the basis that a uni-national state is unworkable for a host of structural reasons, not least the lack of reform progress to date, secession is viewed as the preferred choice for the betterment of the region’s people.

Co-sponsored: Cornell Institute for European Studies

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