Climate Change Seminar - Communicating Climate Change

Monday, April 25, 2016 at 3:35pm to 4:35pm

Plant Science Building, 233

Led by: Katherine McComas (Communication)

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Abstract:  Much has been made about the politicization of climate change and the partisan divide in light of scientific evidence. This talk will review some of the seminal findings in communication research that examines public opinion about climate change and some of the explanations for the persistence of a partisan divide. In doing so, it will explore why, in the face of copious amounts of scientific evidence, people still choose to deny its existence and refute any policy action. It will also provide examples of some recent research that examines how even the subtle cues of labeling in climate change communication can influence people’s support for policy.  

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The 2016 Cornell University Climate Change Seminar meets Monday afternoons through May 9. This university-wide seminar provides important views on the critical issue of climate change, drawing from many perspectives and disciplines. Experts from both Cornell University and other universities will present an overview of the science of climate change and climate change models, the implications for agriculture, ecosystems, and food systems, and provide important economic, ethical, and policy insights on the issue.

The seminar is free and open to the Cornell and Ithaca Community at large, and will be videotaped and available via Webex.

Organized and sponsored by the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, the Cornell Institute for Climate Change and Agriculture, and the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future

Event Type

Seminar

Departments

Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, Sustainability

Tags

science communication

Website

http://www.acsf.cornell.edu/events/Cl...

Speaker Affiliation

Katherine McComas

CornellCast Video URL

Communication

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