Cornell University

Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) National Lecture

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 6:00pm

Goldwin Smith Hall, G22
232 East Ave, Central Campus

Burial, Landscape, and Memory in Early Iron Age Crete

Leslie Day (Wabash College)

Lecture summary:

The role that memory played in the location of settlements and cemeteries in ancient Crete has only recently been recognized. People in the past saw ruins as belonging to earlier cultures and no doubt created myths and stories about them. These stories may have played a role in the location of their buildings and burials. This lecture will investigate sites in the area of Kavousi in eastern Crete and the way in which earlier remains seem to have determined placement of buildings and location of graves in the area during the Bronze and Early Iron Ages. The location of buildings and reuse of earlier objects reveal a perceived continuity of culture, and burials show possible interactions among the people inhabiting the various sites in the area.

Short bibliography and/or website on lecture topic (for lay reader):

O. Dickinson, The Aegean from Bronze Age to Iron Age (Routledge 2006); S. E. Alcock, Archaeologies of the Greek Past: Landscape, Monuments, and Memories (Cambridge University Press 2002); S. Wallace, Ancient Crete. From Successful Collapse to Democracy’s Alternatives, Twelfth to Fifth Centuries BC. (Cambridge 2010).

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